Observable Framework 1.6.0 GitHub️ 1.8k

Markdown

Markdown is a language for formatting text and content; it’s a lightweight, ergonomic alternative (and complement) to HTML. Markdown in Framework extends CommonMark with a handful of features useful for data apps, including reactive JavaScript, HTML, YAML front matter, grids, cards, and notes. This page covers Framework’s extensions to Markdown, along with basic syntax.

Front matter

---
title: My favorite page
toc: false
---

The front matter supports the following options:

The front matter can also override the following project configuration options:

HTML

You can write HTML directly into Markdown. HTML is useful for greater control over layout, say to use CSS grid for a responsive bento box layout in a dashboard, or adding an external stylesheet via a link element. For example, here is an HTML details element:

<details>
  <summary>Click me</summary>
  This text is not visible by default.
</details>

This produces:

Click me This text is not visible by default.

You can put Markdown inside of HTML by surrounding it with blank lines:

This is Markdown inside of HTML!

<div class="grid grid-cols-4">
  <div class="card">

This is **Markdown** inside of _HTML_!

  </div>
</div>

Grids

The grid class declares a CSS grid container. The grid class is designed to pair with the card class and the dashboard theme for dashboard layout.

<div class="grid grid-cols-4">
  <div class="card"><h1>A</h1></div>
  <div class="card"><h1>B</h1></div>
  <div class="card"><h1>C</h1></div>
  <div class="card"><h1>D</h1></div>
</div>

Grids have a single column by default, but you can declare two, three, or four columns using the grid-cols-2, grid-cols-3, or grid-cols-4 class.

The built-in grid class is automatically responsive: in narrow windows, the number of columns is automatically reduced. The four-column grid can be reduced to two or one columns, while the three- and two-column grid can be reduced to one column. (If you want more columns or more control over the grid layout, you can always write custom styles.)

To see the responsive grid layout, resize the window or collapse the sidebar on the left. You can also zoom to change the effective window size.

With multi-column and multi-row grids, you can use the grid-colspan-* and grid-rowspan-* classes to have cells that span columns and rows, respectively.

<div class="grid grid-cols-2">
  <div class="card"><h1>A</h1>1 × 1</div>
  <div class="card grid-rowspan-2"><h1>B</h1>1 × 2</div>
  <div class="card"><h1>C</h1>1 × 1</div>
  <div class="card grid-colspan-2"><h1>D</h1>2 × 1</div>
</div>

By default, the grid uses grid-auto-rows: 1fr, which means that every row of the grid has the same height. The “rhythm” of equal-height rows is often desirable.

<div class="grid grid-cols-2">
  <div class="card">Call me Ishmael.</div>
  <div class="card">Some years ago—never mind how long precisely—having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world.</div>
  <div class="card">It is a way I have of driving off the spleen and regulating the circulation.</div>
</div>

On the other hand, forcing all rows to the same height can waste space, since the height of all rows is based on the tallest content across rows. To have variable-height rows instead, you can either set grid-auto-rows on the grid container:

<div class="grid grid-cols-2" style="grid-auto-rows: auto;">
  <div class="card">Call me Ishmael.</div>
  <div class="card">Some years ago—never mind how long precisely—having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world.</div>
  <div class="card">It is a way I have of driving off the spleen and regulating the circulation.</div>
</div>

Or break your grid into multiple grids:

<div class="grid grid-cols-2">
  <div class="card">Call me Ishmael.</div>
  <div class="card">Some years ago—never mind how long precisely—having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world.</div>
</div>
<div class="grid grid-cols-2">
  <div class="card">It is a way I have of driving off the spleen and regulating the circulation.</div>
</div>

The card class is not required to use grid. If you use grid by itself, you’ll get the same layout but without the card aesthetics.

<div class="grid grid-cols-2">
  <div>Some years ago—never mind how long precisely—having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world.</div>
  <div class="card">Call me Ishmael.</div>
</div>

Use the resize helper to re-render content when the container resizes.

<div class="grid grid-cols-4">
  <div class="card">
    ${resize((width) => `This card is ${width}px wide.`)}
  </div>
</div>

See Responsive display for more.

Cards

The card class is used to group and delineate content. The card classes applies a background and border (with colors determined by the current theme). A card can have a title and subtitle using h2 and h3 elements, respectively.

<div class="card" style="max-width: 640px;">
  <h2>It gets hotter during summer</h2>
  <h3>And months have 28–31 days</h3>
  ${Plot.cell(weather.slice(-365), {x: (d) => d.date.getUTCDate(), y: (d) => d.date.getUTCMonth(), fill: "temp_max", tip: true, inset: 0.5}).plot({marginTop: 0, height: 240, padding: 0})}
</div>
Observable Plot’s title and subtitle options generate h2 and h3 elements, respectively, and so will inherit these card styles.

Cards can be used on their own, but they most often exist in a grid. Cards can contain whatever you like, including text, images, charts, tables, inputs, and more.

<div class="grid grid-cols-2">
  <div class="card">
    <h2>Lorem ipsum</h2>
    <p>Id ornare arcu odio ut sem nulla pharetra. Aliquet lectus proin nibh nisl condimentum id venenatis a. Feugiat sed lectus vestibulum mattis ullamcorper velit. Aliquet nec ullamcorper sit amet. Sit amet tellus cras adipiscing. Condimentum id venenatis a condimentum vitae. Semper eget duis at tellus. Ut faucibus pulvinar elementum integer enim.</p>
    <p>Et malesuada fames ac turpis. Integer vitae justo eget magna fermentum iaculis eu non diam. Aliquet risus feugiat in ante metus dictum at. Consectetur purus ut faucibus pulvinar.</p>
  </div>
  <div class="card" style="padding: 0;">
    ${Inputs.table(industries)}
  </div>
</div>
Remove the padding from a card if it contains only a table.

To place an input inside a card, first declare a detached input as a top-level variable and use Generators.input to expose its reactive value:

const industryInput = Inputs.select(industries.map((d) => d.industry), {unique: true, sort: true, label: "Industry:"});
const industry = Generators.input(industryInput);

Then, insert the input into the card:

<div class="card" style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; gap: 1rem;">
  ${industryInput}
  ${resize((width) => Plot.plot({
    width,
    y: {grid: true, label: "Unemployed (thousands)"},
    marks: [
      Plot.areaY(industries.filter((d) => d.industry === industry), {x: "date", y: "unemployed", fill: "var(--theme-foreground-muted)", curve: "step"}),
      Plot.lineY(industries.filter((d) => d.industry === industry), {x: "date", y: "unemployed", curve: "step"}),
      Plot.ruleY([0])
    ]
  }))}
</div>

Notes

The note, tip, warning, and caution classes can be used to insert labeled notes (also known as callouts) into prose. These are intended to emphasize important information that could otherwise be overlooked.

This is a note.
<div class="note">This is a note.</div>
This is a tip.
<div class="tip">This is a tip.</div>
This is a warning.
<div class="warning">This is a warning.</div>
This is a caution.
<div class="caution">This is a caution.</div>

Per CommonMark, the contents of an HTML block (such as a <div class="note">) are interpreted as HTML. For rich formatting or links within a note, use HTML.

This is a styled tip using HTML.

<div class="tip">
  <p>This is a <i>styled</i> tip using <small>HTML</small>.</p>
</div>

Alternatively, use blank lines to separate the contents of the note from the note container, and then the contents will be interpreted as Markdown.

This is a styled tip using Markdown.

<div class="tip">

This is a *styled* tip using **Markdown**.

</div>

You can override the note’s label using the label attribute.

No lifeguard on duty. Swim at your own risk!
<div class="warning" label="⚠️ Danger ⚠️">No lifeguard on duty. Swim at your own risk!</div>

You can disable the label entirely with an empty label attribute.

This note has no label.
<div class="note" label>This note has no label.</div>

Basic syntax

Here are some examples of common Markdown features.

Headings

# A first-level heading
## A second-level heading
### A third-level heading
A second-level heading (##) immediately following a first-level heading (#) is styled specially as a subtitle.

Styling

this is **bold** text
this is __bold__ text
this is *italic* text
this is _italic_ text
this is ~~strikethrough~~ text
this is `monospaced` text
> this is quoted text

Tables

Column 1   | Column 2     | Column 3
---------- | ------------ | ----------
Cell 1-1   | Cell 2-1     | Cell 3-1
Cell 1-2   | Cell 2-2     | Cell 3-2
Align left | Align center | Align right
:--------- | :----------: | ----------:
Cell 1-1   |   Cell 2-1   |    Cell 3-1
Cell 1-2   |   Cell 2-2   |    Cell 3-2

Lists

- red
- green
- blue
  - light blue
  - dark blue
1. first
1. second
1. third
   1. third first
   1. third second
<https://example.com>
[relative link](./dashboard)
[external link](https://example.com)
[external link](<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tar_(computing)>)

For privacy and convenience, external links are given a default rel attribute of noreferrer noopener and a default target attribute of _blank. Hence by default an external link will open in a new window and not pass the (potentially sensitive) referrer to the (potentially untrusted) external site. You can override this behavior by specifying the rel or target attribute explicitly. For example <a href="https://example.com" target="_self"> will open in the same window, and <a href="https://acme.com" rel=""> will allow the referrer.

Images

![A horse](./horse.jpg)
![A happy kitten](https://placekitten.com/200/300)